“When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, “Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.”.

This Mr. Rogers quote says it all. We are in this together and help is always available.  If you’re feeling alone and struggling, please reach out to trusted family or friends. You can also reach out to helping organizations like FACES, NAMI, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Chesterfield Mental Health Support Services, and other helping organizations like the Crisis Text Line by texting TALK to 741741 or National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK. You are important. We need you here. Please look for the helpers.

Here are excellent tips on stress reduction:

TIPS: Taking Care of Your Mental Health in the Face of Uncertainty 
Right now, many of us are worried about COVID-19 or Coronavirus. We may feel helpless about what will happen or what we can do. When things feel uncertain or when we don’t generally feel safe, it’s normal to feel stressed. 

Stress can be a normal reaction, but sometimes it can also take a toll on our mental health. We don’t always know it’s happening. You might feel more on edge than usual, angry, helpless or sad. You might notice that you are more frustrated with others or want to completely avoid any reminders of what is happening. For those of us who already struggle with our mental wellness, we might feel more depressed or less motivated to carry out our daily activities.
 
It’s important to note that we are not helpless in light of current news events. We can always choose our response. If you are struggling, here are some things you can do to take care of your mental health in the face of uncertainty:

Separate what is in your control from what is notThere are things you can do, and it’s helpful to focus on those. Wash your hands. Remind others to wash theirs. Take your vitamins. Limit your consumption of news.

Do what helps you feel a sense of safety. This will be different for everyone, and it’s important not to compare yourself to others. It’s ok if you’ve decided what makes you feel safe is to bake every day or play board games or watch movies but but make sure when you are staying at home, your actions are based on staying well and not because it’s part of depression or symptoms flaring up.

Get outside in nature–but wear your mask and continue to avoid crowds. Exercise helps both your physical and mental health.

Challenge yourself to stay in the present. Perhaps your worry is compounding—you are not only thinking about what is currently happening, but also projecting into the future. When you find yourself worrying about something that hasn’t happened, gently bring yourself back to the present moment. Notice the sights, sounds, tastes and other sensory experiences in your immediate moment and name them. Engaging in mindfulness activities is one way to help stay grounded when things feel beyond your control.

Stay connected and reach out if you need more support. Talk to trusted friends about what you are feeling. If you are feeling particularly anxious or if you are struggling with your mental health, it’s ok to reach out to a mental health professional for support. You don’t have to be alone with your worry and it can be comforting to share what you are experiencing with those trained to help. 

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.