ALSO: WHAT SIGNS TO LOOK FOR IF YOU ARE WORRIED ABOUT A LOVED ONE CONSIDERING SUICIDE.

Here are a few Suicide Prevention Apps that may make a difference.  If texting is your preferred way to communicate, there is a crisis text line for you and, of course, there is always the “old school”  National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

 

 

Crisis Text Line   TEXT 741741

Crisis Text Line provides free, 24/7 service to people in crisis. All via text. For more information, visit us at crisistextline.org. This page is not a resource for counseling. In crisis now? We got this. Text 741741.

 

THE APPS:

My3app

Created in partnership with the California mental health services authority, this app lets you stay in touch with your network and plan to stay safe. You can be prepared to help yourself and reach out to others when you’re having thoughts of suicide.

You Are Important — Depression, Suicide and Bullying Prevention Videos App

This app is from the same people behind It Gets Better. The campaign to prevent suicide in the gay community started by Dan Savage and his husband Terry Miller. This particular app is geared towards the LGBT community. The developers call it the little app with the big message: You are important.

Suicide Safe by SAMHSA

According to the app, it is a suicide prevention learning tool with a behavioral health provider component and is nationally recognized by the suicide assessment five step evaluation and triage practice guidelines. This app provides tips and offers real time “what to do” action, as well as referrals for treatment.

More: Talking about suicide prevention is the first step toward making a difference

The Jason Foundation’s A Friend Asks by Bluechip Athletic Solutions

If you suspect that someone in your life may be suicidal, this app provides help for you. Would you even know how to respond if you recognize that somebody close to you was about to take their own life? This app provides warning signs as well as do’s and don’ts for you to help the person you love or even just someone you know who is in crisis.

ReliefLink by Emory University

Emory University has always been on the cutting edge of human development. This app is incredibly innovative, designed specifically for improving mental health and offering help near you in your area immediately if you are in crisis. You can track your mood daily and be active in your own progress. It’s a very cognitive behavioral approach. This app also has a place for you to put all of your important information, like insurance information and your doctor’s details.

ALSO

______________________________________________________________________

What to look for if you are concerned about a loved one considering suicide.

Seek help as soon as possible by contacting a mental health professional or by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK if you or someone you know exhibits any of the following signs:  The Veterans Crisis Line connects Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with qualified, caring Department of Veterans Affairs responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text. Veterans and their loved ones can call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online, or send a text message to 838255 to receive confidential support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. Support for deaf and hard of hearing individuals is available.

  • Threatening to hurt or kill oneself or talking about wanting to hurt or kill oneself
  • Looking for ways to kill oneself by seeking access to firearms, available pills, or other means
  • Talking or writing about death, dying, or suicide when these actions are out of the ordinary for the person
  • Feeling hopeless
  • Feeling rage or uncontrolled anger or seeking revenge
  • Acting reckless or engaging in risky activities – seemingly without thinking
  • Feeling trapped – like there’s no way out
  • Increasing alcohol or drug use
  • Withdrawing from friends, family, and society
  • Feeling anxious, agitated, or unable to sleep or sleeping all the time
  • Experiencing dramatic mood changes
  • Seeing no reason for living or having no sense of purpose in life

Developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.